Blog

Tips for First Time Voters

In celebration of the 100 year anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we want to prepare all women to exercise their right to vote. Below are some tips to make your first voting experience a breeze.

The fight for women’s equality started in 1848 when women demanded the right to vote. Over the next 72 years, women marched, lobbied, protested and fought for the right to vote. Finally, on May 21, 1919, the U.S. House of Representatives approved an amendment that guaranteed women the right to vote*. Over the next year, states began to ratify the 19th Amendment which became an official part of the Constitution on August 26, 1920.

In celebration of the 100 year anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we want to prepare all women to exercise their right to vote. Below are some tips to make your first voting experience a breeze.

Tips for a First Time Voter

Check out this video to learn more about the process of registering to vote and what to do to cast your vote.

Register to Vote

It can take as little as 2 minutes to register to vote. You can select your state or territory to learn about your state’s deadlines and specific information by visiting Vote.gov. In 39 states and the District of Columbia, you can register online.

You can also register to vote by using the National Mail Voter Registration Form. Make sure you are fully reading the form as each state will have specific requirements.

Find Your Polling Location

On Election Day you will be given a specific place to cast your vote. If you need to find where your polling location is, visit vote411.org. Additionally, visit vote411.org if you would like more information about early and absentee voting options in your state.  

Learn What Is on Your Ballot

Before you enter the voting booth, you need to know what will be on your ballot. Learn what candidates are running for office and the ballot measures on your ballot. Visit this link to find out what is on your ballot before voting day.

We hope you will celebrate the hard work and dedication of the suffragists who helped make the 19th Amendment a reality by voting!

*The Sorority Life and the National Panhellenic Conference (NPC) recognizes the 19th Amendment didn’t expand the right to vote to all women, but as women’s-only organizations we want to highlight the role our members played in the amendment’s passage and acknowledge it was a significant first step for all our members.

Alyssa

Alyssa works at National Panhellenic Conference (NPC) as the digital marketing specialist. She is a member of the Theta Zeta chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha. She attended IUPUI, where she earned degrees in public relations and English. Alyssa is a dog lover and podcast enthusiast.

Interested in blogging for us? Learn More

Curious about sorority life?

Learn more about sorority recruitment, membership and benefits of sisterhood by signing up to receive our newsletter.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

We won’t reach out more than once a month and we promise not to share your information with others.